Upgrading PuppetDB

Sections

Checking for updates

PuppetDB’s performance dashboard displays the current version in the upper right corner. It also automatically checks for updates and will show a link to the newest version under the version indicator if your deployment is out of date.

Migrating existing data

If you are not planning to change your underlying PuppetDB database configuration prior to upgrading, you don’t need to worry about migrating your existing data: PuppetDB will handle this automatically. However, if you plan to switch to a different database, you should export your existing data prior to changing your database configuration, but you must use PuppetDB 3.x to do so. Please consult the Migrating Data for more information.

Upgrading with the PuppetDB module

If you installed PuppetDB with the module, you only need to do the following to upgrade:

  1. Make sure that the Puppet master has an updated version of the puppetlabs-puppetdb module installed.
  2. If you imported the official packages into your local package repositories, import the new versions of the PuppetDB and PuppetDB-termini packages.
  3. Change the value of the puppetdb_version parameter for the puppetdb or puppetdb::server and puppetdb::master::config classes, unless it was set to latest.
  4. If you are doing a large version jump, trigger a Puppet run on the PuppetDB server before the Puppet master server has a chance to do a Puppet run. (It’s possible for a new version of the PuppetDB-termini to use API commands unsupported by old PuppetDB versions, which would cause Puppet failures until PuppetDB was upgraded, but this should be very rare.)

Manually upgrading PuppetDB

What to upgrade

When a new version of PuppetDB is released, you will need to upgrade:

  1. PuppetDB itself
  2. The PuppetDB-termini on every Puppet master (or every node, if using a standalone deployment).

You should upgrade PuppetDB first. Because PuppetDB will be down for a few minutes during the upgrade and Puppet masters will not be able to serve catalogs until it comes back, you should schedule upgrades during a maintenance window during which no new nodes will be brought online.

If you upgrade PuppetDB without upgrading the PuppetDB-termini, your Puppet deployment should continue to function identically, with no loss of functionality. However, you may not be able to take advantage of new PuppetDB features until you upgrade the PuppetDB-termini.

Upgrading PuppetDB

On your PuppetDB server: stop the PuppetDB service, upgrade the PuppetDB package, then restart the PuppetDB service.

$ sudo puppet resource service puppetdb ensure=stopped
$ sudo puppet resource package puppetdb ensure=latest
$ sudo puppet resource service puppetdb ensure=running

On platforms without packages

If you installed PuppetDB by running rake install, you should obtain a fresh copy of the source, stop the service, and run rake install again. Note that this workflow is not well tested; if you run into problems, please report them on the PuppetDB issue tracker.

If you are running PuppetDB from source, you should stop the service, replace the source, and start the service as described in the advanced installation guide.

Upgrading the terminus plugins

On your Puppet master servers: upgrade the PuppetDB-termini package, then restart the Puppet master’s web server:

$ sudo puppet resource package puppetdb-termini ensure=latest

The command to restart the Puppet master will vary, depending on which web server you are using.

On platforms without packages

Obtain a fresh copy of the PuppetDB source, and follow the instructions for installing the termini.

The command to restart the Puppet master will vary, depending on which web server you are using.

Upgrading across multiple major versions

As stated by the versioning policy, you cannot “skip” major versions of PuppetDB when upgrading. For example, if you need to upgrade from PuppetDB 4.2.3 to 6.0.0, you must run some version of PuppetDB 5 at least long enough for it to upgrade your existing data.

The upgrade subcommand can help with this. When specified, PuppetDB will quit as soon as it has finished all of the necessary work:

$ puppetdb upgrade -c /path/to/config.ini

Truncate your reports table

Some PuppetDB versions contain long database migrations that can be avoided by deleting all the reports and resource events from your database. Currently this is true for PuppetDB 6.8.0 and 6.10.0. Please note that PuppetDB migrations are cumulative, so if you’re upgrading from PuppetDB 6.7.0 to 6.11.0 your upgrade will contain two long running database migrations that can be avoiding by deleting your reports.

WARNING: This is a permanent destructive action and should be done with care.

Truncating the reports table will delete all your reports and all their associated resource events. This is primarily helpful for users with large databases when upgrades involve expensive database migrations, such as upgrading PostgreSQL versions.

Monolithic installs

For standard installs, where PuppetDB and Postgres run on the same machine, and you use Puppet’s default user and database names you can delete your reports and resource events by running /opt/puppetlabs/bin/puppetdb delete-reports as root.

Non-default user/database names, PostgreSQL port, or psql location

If you are not running a standard install you can follow the general outline below. Be sure to run puppetdb delete-reports --help to see if you need to customize any of the user or database names for your own install.

Postgres on another server

The delete-reports subcommand lives on the server that runs PuppetDB at /opt/puppetlabs/server/apps/puppetdb/cli/apps/delete-reports. In order for this command to work, you’ll need to manually transfer it to the server that is running PuppetDB’s PostgreSQL and execute it there. It will fail to stop the PuppetDB service, because one doesn’t exist there, but it will continue and delete the reports anyways.

No delete-reports subcommand exists

If no delete-reports subcommand exists, you are on an older version of PuppetDB, but deleting your reports is just as important when upgrading to a version later than or equal to PuppetDB 6.8.0 or 6.10.0. If this is the case, you should delete your reports manually.

First, stop the PuppetDB service where it is running.

service puppetdb stop

Then, on your PostgreSQL server, write the following SQL for your PuppetDB version to a file named /tmp/delete-reports.sql and then set it to be owned by the postgres user (chown postgres:postgres /tmp/delete-reports.sql).

If you are upgrading from a PuppetDB version less than 6.8.0 that does not have the delete-reports subommand, your delete-reports.sql file is,

BEGIN TRANSACTION;

ALTER TABLE certnames DROP CONSTRAINT IF EXISTS certnames_reports_id_fkey;
UPDATE certnames SET latest_report_id = NULL;
TRUNCATE TABLE reports CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE certnames
  ADD CONSTRAINT certnames_reports_id_fkey
    FOREIGN KEY (latest_report_id) REFERENCES reports(id) ON DELETE SET NULL;

COMMIT TRANSACTION;

If you are upgrading from a PuppetDB version greater than or equal to 6.8.0 but less than PuppetDB 6.10.0, your delete-reports.sql file will need to contain

BEGIN TRANSACTION;

ALTER TABLE certnames DROP CONSTRAINT IF EXISTS certnames_reports_id_fkey;
UPDATE certnames SET latest_report_id = NULL;

DO $$ DECLARE
    r RECORD;
BEGIN
    FOR r IN (SELECT tablename FROM pg_tables WHERE tablename LIKE 'resource_events_%') LOOP
        EXECUTE 'DROP TABLE ' || quote_ident(r.tablename);
    END LOOP;
END $$;

TRUNCATE TABLE reports CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE certnames
  ADD CONSTRAINT certnames_reports_id_fkey
    FOREIGN KEY (latest_report_id) REFERENCES reports(id) ON DELETE SET NULL;

COMMIT TRANSACTION;

Now that the file exists and is owned by the postgres user, run

su - postgres -s /bin/bash -c "psql -d puppetdb -f /tmp/delete-reports.sql"
Puppet sites use proprietary and third-party cookies. By using our sites, you agree to our cookie policy.