published on 12 September 2017

Every year we’re excited to see what we find in the data from the State of DevOps survey. (Thank you to the thousands of you who took the 2017 survey!) Without fail, we always discover something interesting that we weren’t expecting or looking for.

That’s certainly true for the 2017 State of DevOps Report, but perhaps even more so for the 2017 DevOps Salary Report, which we released today. Salaries and job titles are shifting in some interesting and surprising ways.

So, what did we learn? Here are some of the findings from this year’s DevOps Salary Report that were particularly interesting to me:

  1. IT job titles are really changing. Among 2016 State of DevOps survey respondents, system administrator was the most common title and DevOps engineer was the fourth most common. This year, DevOps engineer was the most common title and system administrator dropped to the fifth most common title. (For our reflections on the changing roles and responsibilities of sysadmins, check out our blog post from this past Sysadmin Day.)
  2. It can pay to automate. We found that IT practitioners who were doing the least amount of manual configuration management work were getting paid more than their peers.
  3. IT managers are making less. We found the salaries of IT managers decreased in the United States, Western Europe and Asia since 2016. For the rest of our findings, take a dive into the charts and analysis in the full 2017 DevOps Salary Report. And keep your eyes open for personal insights — whether it’s ideas for increasing your salary, or questions to ask during your next one-on-one or job interview.

Thanks again to everyone who took the 2017 State of DevOps survey and made this possible!

Alanna Brown is director of product marketing at Puppet.

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